Friday, October 07, 2016

Journalists hit with $200 Wi-Fi bill for presidential debates - CNET

Journalists hit with $200 Wi-Fi bill for presidential debates - CNET: "Members of the press can expect to pay $200 to access a wireless network during Monday evening's presidential debate at Long Island's Hofstra University. And if they want more, they will be paying more. According to the university's media rate sheet (PDF), a phone line with secured Ethernet runs $600 and unlimited wireless access for 20 or more devices will run $3,500."



"It's not immediately clear what Hofstra's legal basis for this action is since the Federal Communications Commission issued an enforcement advisory last year that said blocking an individual's personal Wi-Fi hotspot is illegal."

Native Hawaiians: Is change in federal status a sign of progress? - CSMonitor.com

Native Hawaiians: Is change in federal status a sign of progress? - CSMonitor.com: "A change in federal policy Friday, as the Department of Interior announced that it had finalized a rule that would allow a native Hawaiian government to form a formal government-to-government relationship with the United States."


Opinion: Privacy isn't dead. Here's why - CSMonitor.com

Opinion: Privacy isn't dead. Here's why - CSMonitor.com: "The argument that people don’t care about privacy anymore since many people share so much information on the web is flawed. That assertion ignores the fact that individuals who share information or communicate on social media are choosing to do so. People should be able to decide whether they broadcast every moment of their lives or whether they don't engage in social media. Or, they can select what bits of their lives to share, and what needs to remain private."



"74 percent of Americans consider it "very important" that they be able to control what information others can access about them, and 86 percent of internet users have taken steps to anonymize their online activity."



"Polls repeatedly show Americans value their privacy highly and do not think they should have to sacrifice it for national security. Further, news of mass surveillance had a significant negative impact on the US economy."



"They may be victims of domestic violence trying to protect their attempts to get help from their abusive partners."




Teen suspended for taking picture of school's dirty water - CNET

Teen suspended for taking picture of school's dirty water - CNET: ""The punishment is inappropriate. I am going to make sure the out of school suspension is expunged from the student's record," Harmala told WXYZ."


Opinion: Think hackers will tip the vote? Read this first - CSMonitor.com

Opinion: Think hackers will tip the vote? Read this first - CSMonitor.com: "First, attackers would need to target online voters (a small minority) who are scattered in various jurisdictions.

Then, once the vulnerable voters are identified, attackers would need to wait for the polling place to transmit those votes. While that kind of attack could work on one person, or a single location, it would be difficult to pull off at any meaningful scale.

Alternatively, an adversary could invent an entirely new population of phantom voters, register them to vote remotely, and stuff the ballot box with fake votes. That's possible, but highly improbable. "



"[server attacks] would be pretty obvious to system maintainers, and I suspect polling administrators would quickly switch back to relying on the mail. Remember, online systems aren't intended for use on Election Day, rather they merely collect absentee ballots."



"While remote attacks are possible, it's not like someone could affect voting from another country. They'd more likely need to be parked outside the polling place. So, although Wi-Fi voting machines are a terrible idea, they don't appear to be an existential threat to democracy at the time being."

Preserving a free and open internet (why the IANA transition must move forward)

Preserving a free and open internet (why the IANA transition must move forward): "Thinking that only governments should have a say in the Internet’s future is a dangerous proposition."




Is California's new law a model for curbing prosecutorial misconduct? - CSMonitor.com

Is California's new law a model for curbing prosecutorial misconduct? - CSMonitor.com: "The National Registry of Exonerations, launched in 2012, has counted 1,894 Americans exonerated since 1989. Fifty-one percent of those wrongful convictions were due to official misconduct, occurring most commonly in homicide cases. A number of high-profile exoneration cases in recent years have drawn the public's attention to such misconduct, including instances of prosecutors withholding, or tampering with, exculpatory evidence. "



"It’s about a system that is void of integrity. Mistakes can happen. But if you don’t do anything to stop them from happening again, you can’t keep calling them mistakes."



"To curb prosecutorial misconduct while reducing the chances of baseless claims, Alonso suggests creating a "strong law" that criminalizes tampering of evidence by any officer of the court. "

Saturday, August 06, 2016

Revoke Obama's Nobel Peace Prize | Cato Institute

Revoke Obama's Nobel Peace Prize | Cato Institute: "The New York Times noted the irony that the longest-serving wartime president was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize only nine months into his first term in office."



"According to the government’s own documents, nearly 90 percent of the people killed in U.S. airstrikes during one five-month period were not the intended targets."

Paul Ryan outlines 'A Better Way' – now he needs listeners - CSMonitor.com

Paul Ryan outlines 'A Better Way' – now he needs listeners - CSMonitor.com: "The plan would increase work requirements for welfare recipients, including for food stamps; better reward work so that poor people aren’t punished for earning more; consolidate federal programs, and give states more say in how aid is distributed."


Why albinos are being killed in Malawi, and what's being done to stop it - CSMonitor.com

Why albinos are being killed in Malawi, and what's being done to stop it - CSMonitor.com: "Violent crimes against albinos are typically committed by individuals or criminal gangs driven by the belief that albino body parts can bring wealth, happiness and good luck. It is common for attackers, many of whom live in poverty and have low levels of literacy, to sell their victims' limbs to witchdoctors for use in charms and magical potions. "